Editorial: Give wild horse and burro plan a chance

An unprecedented collaboration between various government agencies, animal welfare groups and ranchers has created a plan aimed at finally bringing the wild horse and burro population on the Western range under control.

The disparate groups include the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the National Cattleman’s Beef Association, the Humane Society of the United States, the American Farm Bureau, American Mustang Foundation, the Public Lands Council and others.

The plan calls for removing 15,000 to 20,000 wild horses a year from the range in the next three years, drastically increasing the use of temporary and permanent sterilization, moving horses to cheaper cost-effective private grazing land and promoting adoptions. The removal number would drop drastically as fertility control takes effect.

As of March, the Bureau of Land Management estimated that the population of wild horses and burros on federal lands is more than 81,951 — more than three times 26,690 the agency believes the range can sustain — and that population can grow 18 percent a year, the plan warns. Meanwhile, the BLM maintains 36,906 wild horses and burros in large pasture facilities, and 14,029 horses and burros in corral facilities at a cost of $50 million a year.

The plan calls from increasing the BLM’s total wild horse and burro management budget from the current $80 million a year to $130 million initially, but with cost declining as fertility control cuts population growth and horses and burros are adopted. The goal is to sterilize 90 percent of the animals on the range.

Nancy Perry, ASPCA’s senior vice president, told The Associated Press, “Not every advocate wants to engage with or work with those that they have been in battle with over the years. But BLM’s current polices are ineffective. If they continue on the road they’re on now, it means disaster.”

In fact, the AP reported that the plan has ignited fierce opposition from the American Wild Horse Campaign and Friends of Animals, groups that are already challenging in the courts earlier horse round-ups.

The American Wild Horse Campaign was quoted as saying, “The groups promoting this plan have been co-opted into supporting the livestock industry’s agenda for wild horses by the BLM’s vague promise to utilize undefined ‘population growth suppression’ methods. By mandating the removal of a startling 15,000 to 20,000 wild horses a year, the plan will result in the reduction of America’s wild herds to extinction levels.”

Despite the hysteria from the horse huggers, the plan is at least putting forward a rational effort to control the horse and burro population on the range. The plan estimates it will take 10 years to reach the population that the BLM says is sustainable. Currently the animals in many herd management areas are so overpopulated that they are starving and damaging water resources. Grazing land needed by cattle and other wild animals is depleted.

The plan also addresses the cost of keeping wild horses off the range.

“Every day, the BLM spends $1.82 per horse in long term holding pastures and an average of $4.99 per horse in corral facilities,” the plan notes. “A shortage of pasture facilities has forced the agency to use corral facilities for long term purposes — at more than twice the expense. … The agency estimates that each of those horses costs approximately $46,000 over the course of their lifetime. We propose that the BLM relocate corralled horses and burros, along with any additional removed horses and burros, to more cost-effective private pastures.”

The status quo is not acceptable. Give this plan a chance.

A version of this editorial appeared this week in some of the Battle Born Media newspapers — The Ely Times, the Mesquite Local News, the Mineral County Independent-News, the Eureka Sentinel,  Sparks Tribune and the Lincoln County Record.

Wild horses being warehoused at Palomino Valley.

7 comments on “Editorial: Give wild horse and burro plan a chance

  1. […] Source: Editorial: Give wild horse and burro plan a chance […]

  2. HighflyinBrien says:

    Actually the “horse huggers” as you derogatorily refer to them…have been putting forth solid action plans for years, all to the deaf ears of the BLM and the ineffective bureaucrats in Washington, who dance to the tunes put forth by the cattle and sheep industries who pay for the band. The million dollar helicopter round-ups, and other such nonsense has been paid for by WE the taxpayers.

    https://wildhorseeducation.org/

    http://savingamericasmustangs.org/

  3. Anonymous says:

    Amen HFB!

    Let the cow huggers do what the free markers claim they’re supposed to do in a free market: pay for their own damn cows.

    The minute they stop trying to suck off the teat of the American taxpayer, and put their cows out on our land, is the last time you’ll ever hear a word from them about what happens to the horses and burros.

  4. HighflyinBrien says:

    That IS a damn good ballad. I’m gonna have to try and write one more stanza…where the cowboys and the wild mustang groups come together to battle the inept Feds and the Cactus huggers!

  5. Elloyan is a native Nevadan and Dayton resident.

  6. HighflyinBrien says:

    The sellout of our national heritage – “This Land: How Cowboys, Capitalism, and Corruption Are Ruining the American West” by Christopher Ketcham.

    https://wildhorseeducation.org/2019/05/13/this-land-the-sell-out-of-our-national-heritage-book-review/?fbclid=IwAR0F5Id96PGduDkEpSEGlV5Vz02vDShPnUbae_BHFP29WC3Gr0Xe0E4Wls0

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