Taxation without representation?

Taxation without representation is tyranny, and grounds for a revolution — only many of those being taxed under the Trump federal budget haven’t been born yet.

It is one thing to spend your children’s inheritance. It is another to drive them into debt. We are spending today what they will be earning years from now.

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Reportedly, the proposed $4.4 trillion budget for next year will add $7 trillion to the national debt, which is already $20 trillion, over the next decade. Of course, some will argue that is static scoring and doesn’t take into account the additional taxes that should accrue due to the recent tax cuts. Then, neither does it account for possible soaring interest rates on that debt.

Budgeting one’s spending based on the anticipation of a raise is foolhardy.

In 2015 Trump said, “But if we don’t make our nation rich again, we don’t take back our jobs from all these other countries that are ripping us and if we don’t take back our money and we don’t, you know, balance up our budget at least get it damn close and soon we’re not going to have a nation anymore.”

This is the same Trump who the next year who disputed his own comments about the nation defaulting on its debt by saying, “First of all, you never have to default because you print the money.”

Welcome to Zimbabwe.

 

 

 

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5 comments on “Taxation without representation?

  1. Vernon Clayson says:

    The president proposes, the Congress disposes. The Congress took no blame for spending
    under Obama and few members of that gang faulted Obama, nothing has changed for them except they have Trump to blame. Imagine using expenditures on illegal immigrants as the major means to conjure up a budget

  2. OK, for the record, the Daily Wire is reporting that for the month of January, which includes some of the changes from the $1.5 trillion tax cut, the Treasury collected just over $361 billion, a record for the month of January.

    Meanwhile, the feds spent $312 billion, $49 billion surplus.

    One month does not a decade make, but this shows some of the rationale of dynamic scoring.

    https://www.dailywire.com/news/27064/trumponomics-feds-just-made-history-tax-collection-james-barrett

  3. Bill says:

    Everyone has forgotten that the U,S. Constitution’s articles, and Amendments, specify the prerogatives of the Feds. They are listed in Article I, Sec. 8; Articles II-V; Amendments XIII-XVI, XIX-XX, XXIII-XXVI. These prerogatives belong to one of the following categories:
    1) Defense, war prosecution, peace, foreign relations, foreign commerce, and interstate commerce;
    2) The protection of citizens’ constitutional rights (e.g the right to vote) and ensuring that slavery remains illegal;
    3) Establishing federal courts inferior to the SCOTUS;
    4) Copyright protection;
    5) Coining money;
    6) Establishing post offices and post roads;
    7) Establishing a national set of universal weights and measures;
    8 ) Taxation needed to raise revenue to perform these essential functions.
    Those are the only prerogatives of the Feds. The Tenth Amendment states that all prerogatives not explicitly given to the Federal Government, nor prohibited of the states, are reserved to the states or to the people (i.e. individual Americans). So the Feds are not allowed to handle any issues not explicitly listed in the Constitution; their prerogatives are limited to what the Constitution explicitly states.
    If, the expenditures of the Federal Government were limited as provided in the Constitution, we would not be having a budget crisis.

  4. Anonymous says:

    Someone missed the part of the Constitution about providing for the common welfare.

    Not really a surprise I guess.

  5. Anonymous says:

    And of course NOWHERE does the Constitution limit the powers granted to the federal government as those “explicitly” specified.

    Probably an oversight

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