What will we do with a drunken sailor?: ‘Put him in a long boat till he’s sober’

Riddle: What is the difference between the Nevada Legislature and a drunken sailor?

Answer: Eventually the drunken sailor sobers up.

The Economic Forum, which is tasked with estimating state general fund revenues so the lawmakers can dodge blame for overestimating, has found a few million more coins in between the couch cushions — $96 million. So with that and a few other tricks the governor and the Legislature will have $8.2 billion to blow over the next two years.

The entire story in the morning newspaper went over the various ways people in Carson City are contemplating spending the extra cash, but the reporter could not manage to find a single person to suggest such an audacious concept as: Let the taxpayers keep it.

Gov. Sandoval wants to spend the windfall on education. “I introduced the weighted student funding formula last session, and this additional money provides a unique opportunity to invest directly in students who are economically disadvantaged, English learners, gifted and talented and in special education,” he was quoted as saying. For all the good that has done over the years.

Democratic Assembly Speaker Jason Frierson and Democratic Senate Majority Leader Aaron Ford said in a joint statement quoted by the paper, “While these newly projected revenues will not be enough to fully meet our needs in public education, mental health, job training, and other vital services, we are committed to putting our tax dollars to work for the hardworking Nevadans who still feel left behind.” How about some concern for the taxpayers who keep paying more and getting no recognizable return on their investment?

That $8.2 billion general fund budget is a 12.3 percent increase over the previous biennium’s $7.3 billion spending, while inflation in the past two years amounted to 2.5 percent. The general fund is only about a third of the total state spending.

Since 2011 the state general fund budget has grown by 32.3 percent, while inflation amounted to 7.9 percent. Since 2001 that budget has grown by 122 percent, compared to 37.5 percent growth in the cost of living.

As my ol’ Pappy used to say: “You pays your money and you takes your chances. But mostly you just pays your money.”

 

 

 

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7 comments on “What will we do with a drunken sailor?: ‘Put him in a long boat till he’s sober’

  1. Athos says:

    Theme song for NFL films

  2. Email this morning: Americans for Prosperity-Nevada’s state director, Juan Martinez released the following statement:
    “The $140 million revenue windfall was only just announced and already Nevada politicians are dreaming up ways to spend it. But the better bet would be to use it to give hardworking Nevadans much-needed tax relief by rolling back some of the tax increases implemented in the previous session.”

  3. Bill says:

    Juan Martinez understands that most legislators are addicted to spending money as surely as addicts are to their drugs. It is through spending taxpayer money that legislators reward constituent(s)(cies) just as surely as withholding governmental funding punishes them. That was something Harry Reid understood perfectly and played magnificently to his advantage but often to the public detriment.

  4. Athos says:

    Often? We are 20 trillion in debt. It was always to the public detriment!

  5. Anonymous says:

    The 20 trillion is an abomination and Harry contributed to it. He was not without accomplices, both Republican and Democrat, aided and abetted as they were, by an electorate dedicated to government spending.

  6. Bill says:

    Last comment was me about Harry and his accomplices.

  7. […] What will we do with a drunken sailor?: “Put him in a long boat till he’s sober” Riddle: What is the difference between the Nevada Legislature and a drunken sailor? Answer: Eventually the drunken sailor sobers up. […]

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