Nevada ObamaCare 2017 premium increase less than half of national average

Perhaps you’ve heard, ObamaCare premiums are going up 25 percent on average next year for the most common coverage. It was in all the papers.

But in Nevada the rates are only going up 8 percent — which was not in all the papers. That’s good news, better news and bad news. It is good for those purchasing insurance on Nevada’s health insurance exchange that the rates aren’t up as much as the national average and nowhere close to Arizona’s skyrocketing 145 percent. The better news for the vast majority of ObamaCare customers is that the out-of-pocket expense is increasing by zero percent. The bad news is that the taxpayer is picking up the increase.

The Kaiser Family Foundation used the second-lowest silver premium for a 40-year-old non-smoker to analyze the changes state by state. Here is the chart:

aca-by-state

Actually, the Nevada health insurance exchange reported the likely insurance rate changes back in August.

Health Plan of Nevada (UnitedHealthcare’s HMO) is increasing rates in 2017 by 10.4 percent increase for its 50,000 members. Prominence (formerly Saint Mary’s HealthFirst) is going up 17.51 percent increase for its 11,000 members. Anthem (HMO Colorado/HMO Nevada), which is the only plan available in 10 rural Nevada counties is going up 8.58 percent for its nearly 10,000 members. Anthem (PPO, also called Rocky Mountain Hospital and Medical Service) is increasing 13.8 percent for 19,000 members.

The overall weighted average proposed rate increase for the entire individual market in Nevada (including the exchange carriers) works out to 15.02 percent for 2017, which is higher than the 9.58 percent hike in 2016.

 

No one is yet reporting, so far as I can find, the total hit the taxpayers will be absorbing for the premium increases.

AP noted that the spike in premiums generally does not affect the employer-provided plans that cover most workers and their families.

According to a recent editorial, ObamaCare is particularly affecting rural Nevadans.

(AP photo via WSJ)

(AP photo via WSJ)

20 comments on “Nevada ObamaCare 2017 premium increase less than half of national average

  1. nyp says:

    Like the vast majority of working-age Americans, I obtain health insurance through the insurance plan offered by my employer. So premiums on the ObamCare exchanges do not affect me. However, just like the people who purchase ObamaCare on the exchanges, my health insurance (and that of anyone else who uses an employer plan) is subsidized by the American taxpayer. Why is that? Well, first, part of my premiums are paid for by my employer. But that contribution towards paying the cost of my insurance is excluded from my taxible income. Second, part of my own contribution towards my health expenses is made using pre-tax dollars.

    Under ObamaCare, people who do not get insurance through their jobs get at least a partial subsidy, depending on their annual income. That feature partially but not completely equalizes the taxpayer subsidy that people like me receive.

    Why would anyone object to that?

  2. Anonymous says:

    Because they want the terrorists to win?

  3. Steve says:

    The objection is to being federally forced to purchase product from private industry. In every case, a limited availability and only within state lines.

    If one wishes to compare it to liability insurance on a car, then it needs to be the same in that any insurance company that meets state requirements can sell in the state. No borders.
    And the requirement must not be federal, it must be up to the states to set any such requirement and set minimum levels of coverage. Then it would be the same as car insurance.

    What Obamacare is now is one size for all, no matter what you do or do not need.

  4. Nyp says:

    You are addressing a completely different issue

    But, no matter

    the “across state borders” stuff that Republicans always push is the opposite of what you think should be done. The idea is to let Mississippi insurance companies sell insurance to Nevada residents that doesn’t meet Nevada standards. If you sell a policy that doesn’t cover colon cancer, breast cancer or cardiac conditions, you can make it pretty cheap. Then healthy people in their 20s will buy those policies and leave the rest of you stuck.

  5. Steve says:

    “The idea is to let Mississippi insurance companies sell insurance to Nevada residents that doesn’t meet Nevada standards. ”
    I didn’t say that, nor did I repeat the mantra you claim for the Republicans.

    And;
    If a Mississippi based car insurance company wishes to sell in Nevada, it must meet Nevada’s insurance requirements.
    So you bullshit again.

    But it is the law of the land, so your continued defenses are unwarranted. We have to swallow it…no matter how sour it is becoming.

  6. Steve says:

    Still think Trump isn’t actively out to screw the Republican party, Nyp?
    (Clinton’s are getting literally “yuge” help from their, very close, friend)

    Yet another twist of the knife.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2016/10/25/trump-halts-big-money-fundraising-cutting-off-cash-to-the-party/?wpisrc=al_alert-COMBO-politics%252Bnation

  7. Rincon says:

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but isn’t it the states’ rights people that keep insurance from being sold nationwide? I think it would be a great help.

  8. Really Steve…let’s look at this logically, there are less than two weeks before the election, should your priority be getting elected…or raising money for “the party?” Let’s not forget that many spineless establishment politicians (Joe Heck, Paul Ryan, John McCain, Lindsey Graham, Kelly Ayotte) have jettisoned any support for the top of the ticket. It’s a smart move for Trump…he actually wants to win.

  9. The trajectory of our fearless Community Organizer in Chief’s signature piece of legislation…the UN-affordable Care Act…

  10. Nyp says:

    Steve – the Republican “proposal” is to allow Mississippi insurance companies to sell insurance in Nevada that doesn’t meet Nevada standards. After all, if the insurance met Nevada standard it wouldn’t be any cheaper

  11. Nyp says:

    Brian- it really bothers you that 20 million more Americans now have health insurance and that cost growth has plummeted

    What a terrible situation

  12. Steve says:

    Nyp, I wasn’t talking about the Republican plan. I was saying what it would take to equate any such plan with auto insurance.

    Nevertheless, you wish to insist on playing word games.

    Typical

  13. Interstate Commerce Clause.

  14. Steve says:

    More people vying for the customer base while selling identical product, won’t result in price competition.

    Nyp, that is total bullshit.

  15. Barbara says:

    Conservatives warned that Obamacare would not work, but liberals didn’t listen.

  16. nyp says:

    Insurance companies that wish to sell health insurance that meets Nevada standards can easily get licensed by the Insurance Department. What supposedly brings down prices, according to the sorts of proposals favored by Barbara and Mr. Mitchell, are plans from other states that don’t require coverage of expensive conditions. That leads to an actuarial death spiral that eventually destroys insurance markets.

  17. Steve says:

    Still can’t sell across state lines, those business’s are forced to have a physical presence and a state license.
    Auto insurance is not required to do that, nyp.
    Those companies are licensed to do business by one state and sell to people in other states the levels of insurance required by those other states. What you want them to do is be licensed by and have a physical presence in each and every state where they wish to do business.
    You want insurance costs to continue to go up.

  18. nyp says:

    to sell motor insurance in the State of Nevada you need to be licensed by the State of Nevada.

  19. Steve says:

    Nits, nyp pics nits.

    That license is very different from health insurance. To sell health insurance to a state’s resident the company must have a physical presence in the state. You still insist the two are the same when they very obviously are not.
    For instance, I just renewed auto coverage and no other company was able to offer lower premiums so I stayed with my out of state insurer.
    This is not an option for health insurance.

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