Can anyone explain the election anomaly in Congressional District 4’s Republican primary?

Reportedly a photo of the elusive Mike Monroe

Reportedly a photo of the elusive Mike Monroe

In more than four decades of covering elections across four different states, I’m not sure I’ve ever seen anything quite like the results Tuesday evening in the Republican primary for Congressional District 4.

Yes, Crescent Hardy won the right to advance to the general election against incumbent Steven Horsford capturing nearly 43 percent of the votes cast, besting Niger Innis’ 33 percent. But how to explain how Mike Monroe picked up 22 percent of the votes cast?

Monroe is a cipher. He did not campaign. He raised and apparently spent no money. He did not debate. He did not go door to door. He gave no media interviews. Few have even seen a photo of him.

Conservative writer Chuck Muth dismissed it as

“How is that possible?

“Because those folks weren’t voting for Monroe.  They were voting against both Hardy and Innis.  And since there was no ‘None of the Above’ option on the ballot, since this was not a statewide race, the Monroe vote was a ‘pox on both your houses’ vote, not a vote for an unknown candidate.”

But if so, why did Monroe get 22 percent of the vote, while Carlos Poliak, who at least submitted his photo and information about himself to the press, garner only 2 percent? Poliak got 523 votes to Monroe’s 5,392.

A Review-Journal story noted:

“Innis also said he planned to ask Secretary of State Ross Miller to investigate the candidacy of Mike Monroe, a Republican contender who finished third behind Innis with more than one-fifth of the vote. Innis questioned whether Monroe had filed all the proper papers to run, including campaign disclosure documents.Although Monroe didn’t campaign heavily or debate, he has run for Congress twice before, giving him greater name recognition with some voters.”

Name recognition?

In 2010 a Michael A. Monroe ran as a Republican for the Congressional District 1 seat and picked up less than 2 percent of the vote. In 2006 a Michael “Ace” Monroe ran for the same seat and got just more than 10 percent of the vote.

Name recognition?

CD1 is entirely within Clark County. So, please explain how Monroe won, yes, won in White Pine and Esmeralda counties. He was two votes shy of Innis in Lyon County, finishing third. He had more votes than Hardy in Mineral County, second place.

A White Pine County source said he was told that a number of Democrats switched to Republican registration just before the primary.

But why? With Horsford’s huge Democrat base in Clark County, neither Hardy or Innis had much of a chance. It was a senseless and futile gesture, if it was an Operation Chaos affair.

I doubt any sports book oddsmaker could calculate the odds of something like this. They are, to say the least, astronomical.

GOP primary results

GOP primary results

10 comments on “Can anyone explain the election anomaly in Congressional District 4’s Republican primary?

  1. […] after I posted a blog questioning how a candidate who did no campaigning could possibly garner 22 percent of the vote in […]

  2. iShrug says:

    It’s possible that Democrats were nervous about Innis being a threat to Horsford. Just sayin.

  3. transrp says:

    Chuck Muth was correct. And the reason that Mr. Monroe got so many more than the other man on the ballott is contained here: http://www.clarkcountynv.gov/depts/election/pages/ballots.aspx

    I leave it as an exercise to the reader to figure it out. I am blessed with dyslexia and aspergers so I excell at pattern recognition. Thus the answer was obvious to me. 🙂

  4. Then why wouldn’t the crossovers vote for Hardy and assure Innis was knocked out, iShrug?

  5. […] there is the Nevada congressional candidate who spent no money, did no campaigning, did no interviews, but still picked up 22 percent of the […]

  6. iShrug says:

    Beats me, Mitch. It should be interesting, I really can’t see how the one faceless dude got all those votes.

  7. […] Can anyone explain the election anomaly in Congressional District 4′s Republican primary? Jun1… In more than four decades of covering elections across four different states, I’m not sure I’ve ever seen anything quite like the results Tuesday evening in the Republican primary for Congressional District 4. […]

  8. Robert Frank says:

    The mystery remains. As of today, not one single registered Republican voter in CD-4 has come forth to claim they willingly voted for candidate Monroe–even in protest. 5,392 registered Republicans casting ballots for Monroe screams “Fraud”!

    Do a Google search and review at least a few of the dozens of links for how easy it is to corrupt/hack voting machines. The potential for voting fraud due to electronic manipulation is staggering.

    This is a serious integrity problem for the SoS. What has SoS done/will do to ensure the end-to-end trustworthiness of our elections?

    There is a public interest group doing something about this clear evidence of corruption This one election casts a dark cloud over our entire election system and must be explained.

    Send email to Tom Mitchell for forwarding to the action group if you want to help expose the cause of this unexplained vote and what will be done by SoS to ensure it “can not happen again”.

    Meanwhile, check out this video if you need some extra motivation to get involved:
    http://teapartyorg.ning.com/video/video/show?id=4301673%3AVideo%3A2893791&xgs=1&xg_source=msg_share_video

  9. I’ve strike 1, due to the fact I arrived at my to start with target lida of a hundred seventy five. I found a different software on for weight loss which i am likely to start out on Monday to find out if that can help!

  10. […] when an unknown Las Vegas handyman who did no campaigning whatsoever won 22 percent of the vote in the Republican primary for Congressional District 4 and won two counties outright, and everyone […]

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